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mandela died at the age of 95. mandela, a remarkable life dedicated his to fighting for civil rights in south africa. mandela lived long enough to see a multiracial democratic south africa. he called it the rainbow nation. the grief over his death crossed racial lines ha he devoted his to erasing. a young man at the age of 25, he joined the african national congress in 1956. mandela was arrested with 155 other political activists and was changed with high treason. the treason trial lasted 4 1/2 years. the charges against him were ultimately dropped. mandela used a false identity to evade the government and traveled to europe and other countries in africa to built support for the anc and study guerilla warfare. when he returned to south africa in 1962, mandela was arrested and sentenced to years in prison. during his sentence, the government charmed mandela and other anc leaders with sabotage and attempting to violently overthrow the government. the winner of 1964, mandela and his colleagues were sentenced to in prison. mandela's brutal imprisonment helped win freedom for his nation.
people that really didn't experience the civil rights movement in the united states. they see this as a landscape of opportunity, and there is room for growth. and so i knew about that, as a young person, in the 90's and i grew up in the south, so in 90s in the south, you can still had a great deal of racial tension. and my parents made sure i knew about nelson, and i think my schoolmates did as welt. >> so it is so personal to so many people. including african-americans in the united states. because there are sort of in some ways parallel tracts. talk about the u.s., and apartheid in south africa, right? >> we picketed with with them. we were there. >> we appreciate it. and president obama has paid tribute to the life of nelson mandela as well. >> that swept college campuses at that time, the first time he ever spoke to a public audience, he had said many times was on behalf of nelson mandela and the antiapartheid movement. he came to the briefing room, he spoke very eloquently. here is more of what he had to say. >> at his trial in 1964. nelson mandela closed a statement fro
john lewis, democrat of georgia and civil rights leader. mr. lewis, thank you for being with us here tonight on this historic day. >> thank you very much, rachel, for having me, and thank you nar rich history, telling the story, what happened and how it happened. it is very moving. >> i have to ask, after your long career, especially as a young man in the south, in the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work inform your own? what has he meant to you over the years? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the vision, the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said, if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle and when i met him for the first time. he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what
of the years he now was experiencing. >> i was so struck by john lewis saying that as a young civil rights leader and activist, he was so influenced -- he and his fellow college students saying they were so influenced by mandela and mandela saying when they met that he had been following the civil rights movement in the united states. you were front and center as part of that movement, the civil rights movement here. you had that experience also in talking to him, the cross-fertilization of these freedom movements. >> yes, i think they fed off of each other. i think while the united states civil rights movement came of age and its victory much earlier than the apartheid struggle, they were very much alike. i think that's what enabled me, i think, to have the success to the extent i did to have it. i didn't go as a journalist going in an objective way, i was informed by the experiences we had in the south and in the united states. so when i got there, i understand. there were significant differences. in south africa the majority were the black people and they had been suppressed by a minori
rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work form your own? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. and when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i noknow all about you. i follow you. you inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they h
, almost like he was interviewing me about american politics and the civil rights movement. because in south africa, the majority of the population is black. he wanted to know, wait, how did a minority in the united states achieve civil rights? we ended up talking about, and he's fascinating with the founding fathers. the idea that george washington gives up power one term. something mandela later does. but also citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states. remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. in a sense, we were inspiring too nelson mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything when you sat down with him that really surpriseded you? i'm sure you prepared ahead of time and researched them and got to know the man through what you were able to read and hear from other personal anecdotes. what did you take away from it? >> i think the thing that surprised me the most is i was saying, you know, mr. mandela, you are a beacon to the world in terms of freedom, struggle, the sacrifice, the 27 years in jail, standing up for principle. he started l
had been partly -- part of a civil rights movement and fought against jim crow, which is our apartheid in america. we appreciated someone who was rising above the situation in south africa so the world could know. for many years their struggle was going on and nobody was listening. >> absolutely. you wrote in your piece on nelson mandela to the very end, he was frail and somewhat forgiveful and remained the father of the nation for south africans and in several trips he made to the hospital over the past two years, he was in his own way preparing his family biological and extended, for his final return home. he was 95. we know this life is not permanent in this form here. when you -- the news broke, despite his age and despite knowing his health situation, no one wanted to let him go for what he represented, even though that continues as he's passed away. >> i think so many people wish it could continue even more intensely. but i've got rn e-mails from friends in south africa who were doctor and people who like you said watched his progression and they say even though -- they've been w
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
that will nelson mandela set. >> want to bring in andrew young, civil rights leader and former ambassador to the united nations. welcome, as well as james joseph, former u.s. ambassador to south africa and duke university professor, both of who new mandela very well on a personal level. ambassador, i'd like to start with you. you draw parallels. you talk about how this was so important, so significant in some ways to the civil rights movement and the struggle at the time. for us, i was a college student when we had a lot of those divest from the from the south africa shantytowns in the yards of the campuses. tell us the connected you had with the civil rights movement. >> understood that as dr. king said, injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. and so we knew of chief albert la tooley and the african national crisis. we entertained oliver tambo and mbeki when they were in exile. but my first real conflict, i went to south africa with arthur ashe in 1974 to play tennis. we tried to seaman della and didn't but we saw robert subuqwai who had just gotten out of jail and we start
of the people. and somehow the movement here, the civil rights movement in our country deserves much credit for the change we now see in america, and in south africa. >> well, and reverend, to that point, that's why it is so interesting -- i think, and potentially enlightening, to see some of the political debate playing out more among republicans. but take a listen to more from former speaker newt gingrich, in doing what rick hertzburg was doing, embracing as a founding father in politics, one of the best things you could say about someone. take a listen. >> posted my statement on her facebook page and was amazed at some of the intensity, some of whom came back three and four and five times, repeating how angry they were. so i wrote my newsletter on friday, basically entitled it, "what would you have done." >> and he goes on to talk about what the legacy of mandela is being a revolutionary and freedom fighter and also a patriot. how do you looking at this now, national/international conversation, how do you think we're doing in remembering our history accurately with apartheid as a foreign
midnight in south africa, the president made the announcement the civil rights icon and leader to the world had passed. >> i'm shere shepherd smith in york. we have learn ed from the president of south africa that the civil rights icon nelson mandela died a short time ago at the age of 95. mandela was the first black president of south africa and an enduring icon of the struggle against racial opposition. he died according to the announcement of the governor leaving the nation without the moral center at a time of growing dissatisfaction with the country's leaders. those words lead the new york sometimes article that came out moments ago. mr. mandela spent 27 years in prison after being convicted of treason. by negotiating with captors after his release in 1990, mandela led the african national congress long a banned liberation movement to an lek to recall victory in 1994, first fully democratic election in that country's history. the new york times goes on, mandela served one term as the president and had not been seen in public since the year 2010 when the nation hosted the world cup socc
to draw profound parallels between our civil rights movement and what they experienced in south africa years ago. >> caller: of course, there's a common thread that is overlooked. gandy went to india. he began movements to south africa. dr. king oftentimes cited ghandi as his exemplary so did mandela. when you speak of the american movement and south africa, there's a common theme. so, there is an intellectual, spiritual relationship. clearly, the movement in south africa was one in which all of the resources of the state were placed against mr. mandela and his movement. in this country, we had our own challenges, of course, coming out of slavery. our civil war, there were places of refuge. during the civil war, there were places of refuge in this country, there were none in south africa. many had to flee and go elsewhere. mr. mandela chose not to flee and go elsewhere. he spent 27 years in prison. >> interestingly, too, martin luther king made an impact while living, but one could argue he's made a greater impact since he has been gone. nelson mandela made the impact while he was stil
't remember much about the civil rights movement don't remember much about his life. they know what he stood for. i think, you know, today in south africa, even when people wake up in the morning because most people don't know he's transitioned and i use that word because in south africa, people don't talk about death and dying. they talk about transitioning and it's a happy time, and i'm sure they're going to be celebrating his life. i hope they will be teaching, teaching, teaching what nelson mandela stood for. this is a moment to teach. it's a teachable moment. as much as it is a moment to reflect and think about what nelson mandela has meant to the world and to these young people who can sing in that neighborhood where they used to not even be able to go without a pass, the black ones. it's that kind of thing that nelson mandela did away with that we need to remember. those young people could not have gone into that neighborhood a this time of night without a pass before nelson mandela and his people liberated the country. so that's what they're, you know, representing now. >> charlayne,
brazile is here, nelson mandela, the civil rights movement in the united states, what was going on in south africa, you and i are old enough to remember those days, the role and as christiane accurately points out, that all of us played in trying to move south africa in a better direction. you remember those days very vividly. >> well, the apartheid regime was a brutal regime. it was a violent regime. and the goal of folks in america, especially young people, was to educate, was to mobilize and to get more sanctions, to get corporations doing business in south africa to put pressure on the south african government. clearly it worked, because after years and years of struggle, finally in 1990, we broke the apartheid regime but it was a long and brutal struggle. >> here's a picture, take a look at this. >>> give us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south afri
his long struggle in the hospital since june and before has come to an end. the iconic civil rights leader and former president of south africa, nelson mandela, is dead today at 95. fox news new york continuing coverage on fox news channel, satellite and cable, more coverage later on your late local news. we continue our coverage on fox news channel across the country and around the world. the death of nelson mandela is not unexpected. we are looking at live pick ktu outside the hospital and near his home. south africa has a week long remembrance planned for him planned well in advance and will be announced by the government shortly is my understanding. we're anticipating we'll hear further from the president at some point. chris matthews is scheduled to interview him today. i believe that was scheduled to be live as part of a college tour. we'll have access to that. we're waiting for word from the white house. nelson mandela a friend to folks around the world. as we wait for further news, i can tell you the associate press puts it, he became one of the world's most beloved statesm
influenced civil rights leaders here and his complicated relationship with the united states. >>> also at this hour, on the record right now, president obama is wrapping up remarks about israel during a time of tension over iran. these are some live pictures. the president literally just wrapping up. more from the white house. >>> and the budget breakthrough, a rare bipartisan plan is in the works right now. i'll ask a gop congresswoman if they'll make deadline day. >>> there will be a lot of friendships made and other kids will have a friend to play with. >> and the buddy bench. one second-grader's idea to solve loneliness is today's big idea. a lot to get to. >>> we start this hour with the release of 85-year-old american veteran merrill newman. newman arrived at san francisco international airport about two hours ago to applause. he was holding his wife's hand. the north korean government released newman late last night. they'd been holding him in the country since october. as you might imagine, newman says he is thrilled to be home. >> it's been a great homecoming. and i'm tired bu
. >> schieffer: did john lewis, one of the heroes of the american civil rights movement, mandela will always be the great teacher. >> nelson mandela, this one man, taught all of us how to live, how not to become bitter. someone who can go to priss son and stay all those years and come out so free. not hating anyone, not putting anyone down. i wish we had a few nelson mandelas in america, or maybe a few more in the world to point us to the best part of our human spirit. >> schieffer: there are many heroes who by a single act or decision have changed history or at least their time. to me what sets nelson mandela apart is that his whole life was a lesson. a lessen in courage, perseverance, patience, bravery and finally forgiveness and redemption. that is rare. over the next 40 years what's the healthiest and best way for them to grow so that they really become cauldrons of prosperity and cities of opportunity? what we have found is that if that family is moved into safe, clean affordable housing, places that have access to great school systems, access to jobs and multiple transportation modes
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
international media showing you how nelson mandela touched lives for civil rights around the world. fellow south africans, you know, nelson mandela brought them together as well. he had been in and out of the hospital for months. in june, he was admitted to a facility for a lung infection. we'll be here all evening long. people are coming here. in fact, a man, moments ago, dropped off flowers here. he just stood. he didn't say anything. he stood, looked at the statue and calmly walked away. live here on massachusetts avenue, outside the south african embassy, i'm shomari stone, news 4. >> thank you. >> we heard the little girl mention his family. he is survived by a wife, three of his children and a couple dozen grandchildren and great grandchildren. >> they were by his bedside late this afternoon. >> we have been seeing the live pictures of nelson mandela's statue this evening. tom sherwood was there when the statue was unveiled this past september. it's a shame to see the fence and the barbed wire. >> i hope it will move some of the reconstruction, the embassy is being rebuilt. if they could m
. the president and iconic champion of civil rights died thursday age 95 after years of illness. he was at his home in johannesburg surrounded by family. south african president jacob zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. mandela's hospital has been moved. this is the scene right outside mandela's home there in johannesburg in the out market neighborhood. you can see right now people are laying flowers and to bring tribute to the man widely seen as the father of modern south africa. he was president for five years. he stepped down, has not been president for 14 years but remains very much in the heart of so many people there. this news came later than night south african time and so right now as this country wakes up, 34 minutes past 8:00, many people are learning nelson mandela is at rest. >> and, of course, mandela accomplished so many great things. he was the father of a nation. he led south africa through its battle against oppression and on to democracy and it kept him away from home. he also stayed very close to his family as we've mentioned our r
. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the presence that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer pour and reconcile for those who jailed him set an example that all humanity took inspire to whether the lives of nation
civil rights movement and after the vietnam war movement, college campuses in the 80s erupted over the apartheid movement. the administration of ronald reagan finally was the first veto override on foreign policy. it was rejected and taken over as jim baker said on "morning joe." taken over by congress. >> why do you think the world was slow when it came to dealing with south africa? >> i have to say that we in the media are partly to blame. we didn't focus that much on what was going on in south africa. until it just became impossible to ignore. when i went the first time in 1985, it was actually the first time that we focused on the people of south africa. both the black and the white and what the human beings of the country were thinking. why the white people thought they were superior to the blacks and did they ever see an end to that thinking? how the blacks were struggling on every level, not just in the streets, but offices where many of them worked. it was initially focusing on the overall idea of those who are fighting against oppression and those who are pressing. we didn
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
person. the disabled people of america are fighting hard for our civil rights. nelson mandela has done a lot of work things considered for things like slavery. we have a topic similar. you are not entitled to the minimum wage here in america. we are specifically exempt. we are so inspired by the work of nelson mandela, we try to continue in that legacy. we want to make it so that our people, our disabled people, are no longer trapped in these workshops. host: why the blind exempt from the minimum wage? caller: the fair labor standards act of 1938 specifically exempts us. the idea is that disabled people are supposed to be inherently less productive. we are less than people. there are a lot of explanations. some people think they are doing by employing disabled people at a penny an our. it is exploiting us. whenever go on to real productive life. we are pushing hard to try to get that change. we want to be able to earn minimum wage for our work, or not work at all. disabled people have the the cassidy to be -- have the thatity to make the change nelson mandela made. host: thank you for
. ♪ >>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers
know, i was part of the civil rights movement in the south. he said oh, do you know maya angelou? she meant so much to me, reading her in prison. you were in his heart and mind all those years. >> he told charlene gault that people had been slipping my books into him all the years. i spoke with one journalist who said, can you imagine being in the hell hole of a south african prison reading the caged bird. >> this means so much to us. i know you've been through a lot in the last days. we just want to say thank you for recollections, thank you for your poetry, and thank you for being with us today. >> thank you miss mitchell. i admire. i watch you with great gratitude and appreciation. >> that is an enormous honor. >> that you very much for your own gentleness. you report on some hellish situations around the world but i never hear the hell in your voice. thank you. >> thank you for that. very much so. >> thank you. >> good-bye to you. coming up next, nelson mandela's leadership, his legacy. but first "nbc nightly news" anchor brian williams sat down in south africa with former preside
and the british refer to as "the riot on king street"? >> all right, i know fort sumter was the civil war, and the alamo was somewhere down in texas, and texas wasn't around during the revolutionary war, i don't think, so the burning of washington and the boston massacre. name that shifts the blame. all right, i'm gonna go with... jumping the question 'cause i'm not sure. >> it's my boo. >> [laughter] >> you gonna hit me with my whole move. i was all like, "what are you gonna do? oh, you gonna jump the question." so you jumped over. not really sure, decided to jump over it. >> not really sure, yeah. >> all right, it is now out of play. you thinkin' it was possibly "b," 'cause that's the one you would have, if you would have guessed. >> yes, if i would have guessed. >> what is the correct answer? it is indeed "b," the boston massacre. again, it's double money week. hopefully this money is small. what'd she jump over? oh, well, jumped over $1,000. that's all right. when we come back, clarice is going for her double money question. millionaire in just a second. it's so much more than coffee.
up icing, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader said when he said, we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you would think they were from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not as foul citizens. we have interests in common. we've got to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. we forget we come from a common country with a common heritage, and for sure a common destiny. final thing i would say, and this is something that no labels is working to overcome, in this city today what all of you have to do every session in your state legislatures, forge principle compromised. the word cover my switchback in the day my father son used to be viewed as that's an act of statesmanship. today it is used as an act of betrayal. if you don't vote with your party, joe manchin was saying, 100% of the time, you are ostracized. there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv. so i'll just finish by recounting some word
various black factions. and the white right wing goes to great lengths to disrupt the negotiations. >> mandela really believed the country was potentially on the brink of civil war. >> reporter: the violence peaks on easter sunday 1993 when a high-ranking anc member is shot outside his home by a white right-wing polish immigrant. >> there was uproar in the country. riots. >> reporter: the country finds itself in a moment of crisis. de klerk and the government are unable to keep the peace. there was only one man who could pull the nation back from the abyss. mandela addresses the country on national television. >> tonight why i'm reaching out to every single south african, black and white, now is the time for all south africans to stand together. >> only he could control the country in a crisis. and effectively, he was president from then on. de klerk was eclipsed. >> reporter: negotiations proceed, building towards a momentous event. >> the first time they were called for dignity was on the 7th of april, 1994. >> reporter: for the first time in its almost 400-year history, south af
of guerrilla leaders in civil wars anywhere who just hate the opposition, right? you see that in syria today but he managed not to let that pull him down but to just focus on changing the system and not hating the people. jon: tom carver covered the end of apartheid in south africa for the bcc. he talked to nelson mandela a couple of types. tom, thank you for sharing those thoughts. >> you're welcome. >> some new details emerging from the investigation into the tragic death of paul walker. police now making an arrest in what they say that these two men stole from the scene of the crash and how they found out about it. we'll get you up-to-date on that. >>> also the white house says the obamacare website now works for most americans. why problems with the site can lead to a nasty surprise for some people who think they signed up for insurance. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. througall of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in t
in this way. >> i follow on exactly from the comments of the right honorable member and her reminiscence but also her mild remonstrance, which is absolutely well made, that we are talking here about a politician. certainly in the civil encounters with president mandela in one capacity, and with mr. mandela post-presidency in other capacities, not only was his sense of humor telling, but so was the self-deprecating use to which he put that humour, lest there was any thought that a political halo could be bestowed upon him. he certainly did not want that, and he would not want that to be part of his legacy today. i mention humor because my first introduction to nelson mandela was far from fortuitous. he was then president, and enormous numbers of parliamentarians had somehow all descended on south africa at the same time. they had come from new zealand, australia, here, ireland, france all on fact-finding missions. it was interesting that these fact-finding missions all coincided with the rugby world cup that was taking place in south africa. given that there were more visiting foreign pol
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